Each SEASFiRE programme is made up of a number of different modules. We use this modular structure to build programmes based on the needs of the group, emphasising different aspects of the marine environment, conservation and media production.

Modules include a combination of classroom presentations, group activities, labs, videos, and diving/snorkelling activities. They can be grouped into the three broad categories of Media, Conservation, Science & Nature, and Media. Some modules run over a number of meetings. Our modules include:

Conservation

Humans and the Ocean

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activity
    • Entanglement
  • Artificial Reef Dive
  • Wreck Dive
  • Coral Planting

As a conservation programme, SEASFiRE has the interactions of humans and the underwater world at its core. While studying this module, students will discuss the benefits of a healthy ocean, and describe human impacts on the marine environment, both positive and negative. The module will finish with a review of artificial reefs and coral planting.

The Jungles of Borneo

  • Number of Meetings: 2
  • Presentation
  • Podcast
    • Beyond the Seas
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • What Has the Rainforest Ever Done for Us?
    • Save Borneo
  • Visit conservation projects in Sabah, East Malaysia

Borneo is one of the richest environmental regions in the world, home to some of the most incredible creatures on earth, including orang-utans, proboscis monkeys, and pygmy elephants. Borneo’s dipterocarp trees and peat lands are among the most effective carbon stores on the planet. Under unprecedented threat from palm oil, urban development and infrastructure projects, we look at the need to preserve the rapidly diminishing rainforest.

Marine Debris

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Entanglement
    • Plastics Survey
  • Dive Against Debris
  • Beach Cleanup

This module is designed to give students an insight into issues surrounding marine debris, its causes and its impacts. They will explore solutions to the problems, as well as considering actions they can take to reduce levels of marine debris.

Sea Turtle Conservation

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook

Six of the world’s seven sea turtles can be found in the Coral Triangle. In this module, we describe the different turtle species, the threats facing them, and whether conservation efforts do more harm than good.

The Secret Life of Corals

  • Number of Meetings: 2
  • Presentation
  • Videos
    • Coral Identification
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Create a Food Web
    • Name that Coral
  • Coral Health Check Dive
  • Coral Planting

This module gives an overview of coral reefs and their environmental importance. The classroom presentation includes the theoretical basis sets the scene for coral planting and coral health check activities during the Field Research trip. It describes different types of coral, coral reproduction, and zonation. It examines the importance and economic value of coral reefs, their growth, and threats to their survival.

The Value of Coral Reefs

  • Number of Meetings: 3
  • Presentation
  • Videos
    • Coral Reproduction
    • Coral Identification
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Coral Reproduction Strategy Simulation
    • Name that Coral
  • Coral Health Check Dive
  • Coral Planting

Setting the scene for much of the field research, The Value of Coral Reefs introduces participants to coral reef ecology, describing different types of coral and coral reefs. Group activities include a game based on coral reproduction and a coral identification activity.

We examine the importance and economic value of coral reefs, their growth, and threats to their survival. Participants learn how to measure coral health and are challenged to identify solutions that would contribute to their conservation.

Science & Nature

Coral Reef Biodiversity

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activity
    • Create a Food Web

Coral reefs are the rainforests of the ocean. Despite covering less than 0.1 per cent of the ocean floor, they are home to 25% of marine species. Reefs are vital to life on earth. This module explores the range of life found on reefs, how different species interact, and marine food webs. The delicate balance that exists within reefs is explored and threats to biodiversity are discussed.

Marine Life Identification

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Dichotomous Keys
  • Document a Critter
  • Marine Life Survey

This module is designed to give students a greater understanding of how to identify the marine life that they will encounter underwater. The students will gain understanding of key terms, create their own dichotomous keys. Students should be able to take the information in this module and apply it on all SEASFiRE dives, enabling them to quickly gain an insight into the marine life they encounter underwater.

Introduction to Wildlife Documentation

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Design a nomenclature system
  • Document a Critter
  • Biodiversity Survey

This module is designed to give students a greater understanding of how animals come to be named and the major nomenclature systems. Participants define key terms, create their own nomenclature systems, and describe the major aspects of modern taxonomy. The best approach to documenting the wildlife the students will encounter is also discussed, including how to note key features of an animal encountered during the expedition, and essential photography training using the SEASFiRE cameras provided for the duration of the program.

Interactions on Coral Reefs

  • Number of Meetings: 3
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Marine Life Identification
    • Coral Health Check practice
    • Build a Food Web
  • Document a Critter
  • Biodiversity Survey
  • Coral Health Check

Understanding the relationships between organisms on coral reefs is vital to knowing how delicately balanced the reef ecosystem is. This module will enable you to identify organisms on the reef, and to identify the role they play in the ecosystem, and their resulting interactions with other marine organisms. You will be able to apply the learnings in this module in a number of dives during the programme, and afterwards, will find you have become a keen enthusiast for spotting new and interesting critters underwater.

Scientific Nomenclature

ben-and-daniel-water-testing

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Classification

This module is designed to give students a greater understanding of how animals come to be named and the major nomenclature systems. Participants define key terms, create their own nomenclature systems, and describe the major aspects of modern taxonomy. It examines the main marine phyla and the species therein.

Scientific Method

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Scientific M&Method

Thanks to scientific advances, many of the most dangerous diseases that plagued mankind have been eradicated. Smallpox and polio are now the stuff of legend. However, we are now at a dangerous point in the public’s relationship with science. This module seeks to cut through the noise that has been created around topics such as climate change by taking you through the scientific method. It will provide an overview on the principles, processes and procedures scientists follow when developing hypotheses, testing them, and contributing to global knowledge. It will discuss so-called scientific controversies, and demonstrate how actual scientific controversies are resolved.

Water – Density and Buoyancy

WaterDensity

  • Number of Meetings: 1 or 2
  • Presentation
  • Group Activities
    • Displacement
    • Salt Water vs Fresh Water
    • Mass Effect
    • Build a Submarine
  • Buoyancy Dive

Buoyancy is a key concept for diving and for understanding underwater physics. Participants study the concepts of buoyancy, density, weight, mass, volume and displacement. There are a number of exercises that the students perform in order to be able to demonstrate understanding of the subject matter. This module takes the form of a lab, with a number of group activities being the main focus of the classroom session.

What’s the Problem?

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook

An introductory module that sets out the environmental challenges facing the underwater world, from global warming to marine debris. We take participants through the issues that we try to address through the programme, using their feedback to shape the programme to support their learning goals.

Media

Introduction to Blogging

  • Number of Meetings: 1
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Finding Your Voice

All SEASFiRE participants blog about their experience. They write expedition diaries, reports on the modules they complete, and contribute to their own dedicated website. In this module, we introduce the concepts and good practices of blogging, and help them to post their first blog and images on their dedicated SEASFiRE website.

Introduction to Podcasting

  • Number of Meetings: 3
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Group Activities
    • Scripting Podcast
    • Recording Podcast
    • Editing and Sound Effects

Podcasting is an increasingly popular form of broadcasting on the internet. In this module, students will select a topic, script, record and edit a podcast, which we will then publish on the SEASFiRE Podcast channel. We will provide recording equipment and teach the students to utilise sound editing software and sound effects to create an engaging and entertaining podcast, up to 30 minutes long.

Underwater Photography

  • Number of Meetings: 2
  • Presentation
  • Student Handbook
  • Surface Practice
  • Editing your photos in Photoshop (optional)
  • 2 Buoyancy Dives
  • 2 Underwater Photography Dives
  • Document a Critter (optional)

As well as being essential to the documentation of marine life, underwater photography is also one of the most exciting skills you can learn underwater. As most beginners soon realise, it’s also a difficult one to master! This is a bespoke SEASFiRE module that is more rigorous than any other underwater photography training we have seen.

We break the process down into the discrete steps you follow to be able to take excellent underwater photos. We teach you to master their buoyancy so that you can remain still and in control in the water. We will show you how to frame shots and adjust your camera settings so that you will be able to take good photographs on land and in the water. Last but not least, we will provide feedback between and after dives on the photographs you have taken, and how you can improve. SEASFiRE can provide all cameras and equipment required for this course.